WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, August 18

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Otto Schubert, postcard to his fiance, 1916, private collection.
Otto Schubert, postcard to his fiance, 1916, private collection.

August 18-June 7, 2015: Perspectives

You can drop by the Smithsonian’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery today through Thursday to watch an artist at work. As part of the museum’s “Perspectives” contemporary art series, performance and installation artist Chiharu Shiota of Japan will create a piece called “Over the Continents,” using everyday objects such as yarn, shoes and handwritten notes. The exhibit officially opens on August 30.

August 18-Oct. 6: Postcards from the Trenches

A century has passed since World War I started in Europe. Starting tomorrow, you can see imagery created by soldiers involved in the conflict. “Postcards from the Trenches: Germans and Americans Visualize the Great War will be on display at Pepco’s Edison Place Gallery in Northwest through September 27. An accompanying film series kicks off today at the Goethe-Institut, where screenings will be held through October 6. The program includes four films that examine the impact WWI had on soldiers and artists.

Music: “Letter to Memphis (Instrumental)” by Pixies


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