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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, August 15

Jazz trombonist Delfeayo Marsalis will play alongside his father, pianist Ellis Marsalis, Jr. in a concert this weekend.
Photo courtesy of Delfeayo Marsalis
Jazz trombonist Delfeayo Marsalis will play alongside his father, pianist Ellis Marsalis, Jr. in a concert this weekend.

August 17: Jonny Lang

The day before Jonny Lang turned 16, the blues guitarist made his big musical debut with an album called "Lie to Me." Years later, the Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter is still releasing new music, experimenting with a variety of genres including pop, R&B, soul and gospel. This Sunday you can hear him perform at The State Theatre in Falls Church with alt-country band Runaway Saints of Nashville. The show starts at 8 p.m.

August 16: The Last Southern Gentlemen Tour

You can see father and son duo Delfeayo Marsalis and Ellis Marsalis, Jr. perform at Bethesda Blues & Jazz tomorrow night. A jazz pianist and composer, Ellis Jr. was inducted into the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame in 2008. Four of his sons are successful musicians, including Delfeayo, a jazz trombonist. The pair released their first collaborative album "The Last Southern Gentlemen" earlier this year and will play some of those songs starting at 8:30 p.m.

Music: "Dr. Jazz" by Ellis Marsalis

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