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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, July 23

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The March on Washington Film Festival returns to D.C. for the second year in a row.
March on Washington Film Festival
The March on Washington Film Festival returns to D.C. for the second year in a row.

July 23-29: March on Washington Film Festival

The second annual March on Washington Film Festival is in full swing, bringing live performances, panel discussions and free movie screenings to locations throughout D.C. This year’s selected films highlight under-told stories about the sacrifices and triumphs of the Civil Rights Era, with a focus on the events of 1964. The festival runs through July 29.

July 23: Cannibal

Carlos is the most prestigious tailor in his city. But he’s also a serial killer who eats his female victims. When a beautiful, young woman comes looking for her missing twin sister, the remorseless murderer starts to fall for her. You can see Cannibal, a Spanish-language love story with a horrifying angle, at the Angelika Mosaic Film Center in Fairfax tonight at 7:30 p.m. Following the show, director Manuel Martin will join attendees via Skype for a live question and answer session.

Music: “A Change Is Gonna Come (Instrumental)” by Sam Cooke


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