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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, July 4

Francis Scott Key’s original manuscript of the “Star-Spangled Banner” lyrics is on display at the National Museum of American History.
National Museum of American History
Francis Scott Key’s original manuscript of the “Star-Spangled Banner” lyrics is on display at the National Museum of American History.

July 4-6: “Star-Spangled Banner” Manuscript

To mark the bicentennial of the Star-Spangled Banner, the Maryland Historical Society loaned Francis Scott Key’s original manuscript of the lyrics to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, where it is currently on display alongside the flag that inspired our national anthem. But don’t take too much time getting there. Sunday is your last chance to see the flag and document paired together.

July 4: D.C.’s Capital City Independence Bash

You can celebrate the 4th of July at The Kennedy Center’s Millennium Stage tonight. Listen Local First presents D.C.’s Capital City Independence Bash featuring a line-up of local musicians, including Jonny Grave, Gordon Daniels of Lucky Dub, Candice Mills of Future, and members of Black Masala. The free concert starts at 6 p.m.

Music: “The Star Spangled Banner” by Charlie Cushman/Randy Howard

NPR

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Presidents And Food?

It's week two of the party conventions, and all these speeches are making us hungry. So we made a quiz to test your savvy about presidents and our favorite topic, food.
WAMU 88.5

Your Turn: Ronald Reagan's Shooter, Freddie Gray Verdicts And More

Have opinions about the Democratic National Convention, or the verdicts from the Freddie Gray cases? It's your turn to talk.

NPR

Police Use Fingertip Replicas To Unlock A Murder Victim's Phone

Michigan State University engineers tried 3-D-printed fingertips and special conductive replicas of the victim's fingerprints to crack the biometric lock on his Samsung Galaxy phone.

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