Art Beat With Lauren Landau, July 4 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Filed Under:

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, July 4

Francis Scott Key’s original manuscript of the “Star-Spangled Banner” lyrics is on display at the National Museum of American History.
National Museum of American History
Francis Scott Key’s original manuscript of the “Star-Spangled Banner” lyrics is on display at the National Museum of American History.

July 4-6: “Star-Spangled Banner” Manuscript

To mark the bicentennial of the Star-Spangled Banner, the Maryland Historical Society loaned Francis Scott Key’s original manuscript of the lyrics to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, where it is currently on display alongside the flag that inspired our national anthem. But don’t take too much time getting there. Sunday is your last chance to see the flag and document paired together.

July 4: D.C.’s Capital City Independence Bash

You can celebrate the 4th of July at The Kennedy Center’s Millennium Stage tonight. Listen Local First presents D.C.’s Capital City Independence Bash featuring a line-up of local musicians, including Jonny Grave, Gordon Daniels of Lucky Dub, Candice Mills of Future, and members of Black Masala. The free concert starts at 6 p.m.

Music: “The Star Spangled Banner” by Charlie Cushman/Randy Howard

NPR

'Rum, Rumba, And Romance': A Book On Cuba's Enduring Mystique

This week, President Obama announced that he will begin to normalize relations with Cuba. Cuban-American writer Richard Blanco recommends a book about Cuba's imprint on the American imagination.
NPR

New Cuba Relationship Could Be A Boon For American Farmers

Two-thirds of the food Cubans eat is imported — but the reestablishment of ties with the U.S. could open opportunities for American farmers.
NPR

'Rum, Rumba, And Romance': A Book On Cuba's Enduring Mystique

This week, President Obama announced that he will begin to normalize relations with Cuba. Cuban-American writer Richard Blanco recommends a book about Cuba's imprint on the American imagination.
NPR

Obama Says 'James Flacco.' The Internet Says, Thank You

It was an honest mistake. But when President Obama said "James Flacco" when referring to James Franco — on a Friday before the holidays, no less — the slip was eagerly received online.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.