WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, June 3

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Boston Ballet performs Rubies from George Balanchine's Jewels.
Gene Schiavone
Boston Ballet performs Rubies from George Balanchine's Jewels.

June 3-6: EuroAsia Shorts 2014

You can watch short films from Europe, Asia and the United States at embassies and cultural centers across D.C. through Friday. The 9th annual EuroAsia Shorts festival presents cinematic work that fits under the theme of Travel and Journeys and represents eight different countries. Tonight’s event will feature films from Korea and Italy, while tomorrow evening’s screenings focus on Japan and Spain. Events are free and open to the public, but you do need to reserve a seat.

June 3-5: Boston Ballet

After 50 years, Boston Ballet is still going strong. The company is celebrating its golden anniversary at The Kennedy Center tonight through Thursday with a mixed-repertory program. The three-part performance includes George Balanchine’s Rubies, Jirí Kylián’s Bella Figura, and Petr Zuska’s D.M.J. 1953-1977.

Music: “Capriccio, For Piano & Orchestra” by Igor Stravinsky

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Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
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Here's The Buzz On America's Forgotten Native 'Tea' Plant

It's called yaupon. Native Americans once made a brew from its caffeinated leaves and traded them widely. With several companies now selling yaupon, it may be poised for a comeback.
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Fannie Lou Hamer and the Fight for Voting Rights

Kojo explores the life and legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer, a poor Mississippi sharecropper who became an outspoken voice in the civil rights movement and the fight for voting rights.

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Sexist Reactions To An Ad Spark #ILookLikeAnEngineer Campaign

After being surprised by online responses to her appearance in a recruiting ad, engineer Isis Wenger wanted to see if there anyone else felt like they didn't fit a "cookie-cutter mold."

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