Art Beat With Lauren Landau, May 20 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, May 20

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The four-piece band Deleted Scenes is back home in D.C. and ready to rock at its official album release party this week.
Deleted Scenes
The four-piece band Deleted Scenes is back home in D.C. and ready to rock at its official album release party this week.

May 20: Adams Morgan Movie Nights

Adams Morgan Movie Nights kick off tonight with a free screening of Up, the feature-length animated film about a 78-year-old balloon salesman who turns his home into an aircraft only to discover an eight-year-old stowaway who has come along for the ride of his life. The film series is presented by the [Adams Morgan Business Improvement District] (http://www.adamsmorganonline.com/) and Marie Reed Elementary School, which is hosting the family-friendly event on its newly-renovated soccer field. The movie starts 15 to 30 minutes after sundown, so try to arrive by 8:15.

May 22: Deleted Scenes

Local indie band Deleted Scenes is back from its national tour and performing this Thursday night at the Rock and Roll Hotel in Northeast. The homecoming celebration and album release party will also feature performances by Laughing Man and Celestial Shore. The show starts at 8 p.m.

Music: “Beam Me Up (instrumental)” by YACHT

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