WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, May 5

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Matthew Schleigh (Tereus) and Dorea Schmidt (Procne) in "The Love of the Nightingale" at Source Theatre. (Stan Barouh)

May 5-25: The Love of the Nightingale

Ovid’s tale of love, violence, lost innocence and metamorphosis is on stage at Source Theatre through May 25. The Love of the Nightingale by Timberlake Wertenbaker is based on the Ancient Greek myth of the rape of Philomele and demonstrates the strength and lifelong bond of two sisters. Tom Teasley provides live musical accompaniment during the show, which is directed by Allison Arkell Stockman. This Constellation Theatre Company production includes adult themes and is recommended for ages 16 and up.

May 5-31: Louder Than a Bomb 2014-DMV Teen Poetry Slam Festival

More than 25 high school slam poetry teams will show off their skills at a month-long festival celebrating the power of the written and spoken word. Louder Than a Bomb-DMV Teen Poetry Slam Festival will include a youth open mic night on May 17 at Busboys and Poets, plus several rounds of the performance poetry competition, which wraps up on May 31 with the Grand Slam Finals.

Music: “Dance of Aphrodite” by Tom Teasley


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