WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, May 5

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May 5-25: The Love of the Nightingale

Ovid’s tale of love, violence, lost innocence and metamorphosis is on stage at Source Theatre through May 25. The Love of the Nightingale by Timberlake Wertenbaker is based on the Ancient Greek myth of the rape of Philomele and demonstrates the strength and lifelong bond of two sisters. Tom Teasley provides live musical accompaniment during the show, which is directed by Allison Arkell Stockman. This Constellation Theatre Company production includes adult themes and is recommended for ages 16 and up.

May 5-31: Louder Than a Bomb 2014-DMV Teen Poetry Slam Festival

More than 25 high school slam poetry teams will show off their skills at a month-long festival celebrating the power of the written and spoken word. Louder Than a Bomb-DMV Teen Poetry Slam Festival will include a youth open mic night on May 17 at Busboys and Poets, plus several rounds of the performance poetry competition, which wraps up on May 31 with the Grand Slam Finals.

Music: “Dance of Aphrodite” by Tom Teasley

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He Died At 32, But A Young Artist Lives On In LA's Underground Museum

When Noah Davis founded the museum, he wanted to bring world-class art to a neighborhood he likened to a food desert, meaning no grocery stores or museums. Davis died a year ago Monday.
NPR

The Strange, Twisted Story Behind Seattle's Blackberries

Those tangled brambles are everywhere in the city, the legacy of an eccentric named Luther Burbank whose breeding experiments with crops can still be found on many American dinner plates.
WAMU 88.5

State Taxes, School Budgets And The Quality Of Public Education

Budget cutbacks have made it impossible for many states to finance their public schools. But some have bucked the trend by increasing taxes and earmarking those funds for education. Taxes, spending and the quality of public education.

NPR

A Robot That Harms: When Machines Make Life Or Death Decisions

An artist has designed a robot that purposefully defies Isaac Asimov's law that "a robot may not harm humanity" — to bring urgency to the discussion about self-driving and other smart technology.

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