Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 24 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 24

Play associated audio
In BOTANICA, the dance-illusionists of MOMIX create a world of plants using movement, lighting, costumes and props.
MOMIX
In BOTANICA, the dance-illusionists of MOMIX create a world of plants using movement, lighting, costumes and props.

Apr. 25-26: BOTANICA
Humor, art, athleticism and visual trickery come together in BOTANICA, a performance by MOMIX. The troupe of dance-illusionists is coming to George Washington University’s Lisner Auditorium tomorrow night and Saturday at 8 p.m. Inspired by plant life, the program relies on elaborate costumes, puppetry, lighting, custom-made props and the performers’ physicality to create a natural world on stage.

Apr. 25: Martha Redbone
Tomorrow night at 8 you can head to The Atlas Performing Arts Center in Northeast for a one-night-only performance by The Martha Redbone Roots Project. Redbone says the project celebrates her family’s coal-mining Appalachian Mountain roots and her Native American heritage through a blend of folk, blues and honky tonk country. The band will play songs from its new album, The Garden of Love – Songs of William Blake, which was recently nominated for an Independent Music Award.

Music: “Mother Nature’s Son” by Jason Falkner

NPR

The Dread Factor: Why Ebola And 'Contagion' Scare Us So Much

Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
NPR

Author And His Daughter Cook Around The Word And You Can Too

Kelly McEvers talks to food writer Mark Kurlansky and his daughter Talia about their cookbook International Night, based on their tradition of cooking a meal every week from a different country.
NPR

Outside Group Mirrors Successful Strategies Of Political Parties

A U.S. Senate seat is up for grabs in Iowa, and the GOP has opened 11 field offices statewide. But there's also a new team working the state, the Virginia-based group Americans for Prosperity.
NPR

Who Owns A Monkey's Selfie? No One Can, U.S. Says

The U.S. Copyright Office says a monkey's photo can't be copyrighted — by the person who owns the camera or anyone else — because it wasn't taken by a human.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.