Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 24 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 24

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In BOTANICA, the dance-illusionists of MOMIX create a world of plants using movement, lighting, costumes and props.
MOMIX
In BOTANICA, the dance-illusionists of MOMIX create a world of plants using movement, lighting, costumes and props.

Apr. 25-26: BOTANICA
Humor, art, athleticism and visual trickery come together in BOTANICA, a performance by MOMIX. The troupe of dance-illusionists is coming to George Washington University’s Lisner Auditorium tomorrow night and Saturday at 8 p.m. Inspired by plant life, the program relies on elaborate costumes, puppetry, lighting, custom-made props and the performers’ physicality to create a natural world on stage.

Apr. 25: Martha Redbone
Tomorrow night at 8 you can head to The Atlas Performing Arts Center in Northeast for a one-night-only performance by The Martha Redbone Roots Project. Redbone says the project celebrates her family’s coal-mining Appalachian Mountain roots and her Native American heritage through a blend of folk, blues and honky tonk country. The band will play songs from its new album, The Garden of Love – Songs of William Blake, which was recently nominated for an Independent Music Award.

Music: “Mother Nature’s Son” by Jason Falkner

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