Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 22 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 22

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Hyun-Woong Kim and Ji Young Chae perform in The Washington Ballet's production of Tour-de-Force: Balanchine!
Steve Vaccariello
Hyun-Woong Kim and Ji Young Chae perform in The Washington Ballet's production of Tour-de-Force: Balanchine!

Apr. 22-May 7: SHRED
You can head to Northwest through May 7 to see SHRED, a new exhibit at Hierarchy, a special project from DC-based No Kings Collective. The solo exhibit features work by LA-based stencil artist Matthew Curran, who creates large-scale murals by cutting away or shredding materials. As spaces become more urbanized, nature recedes into the background. That’s the idea behind this body of work, in which the artist imagines the natural world pushing its way back into the city.

Apr. 23-25: Tour-de-Force: Balanchine!
The Washington Ballet presents Tour-de-Force: Balanchine!, a gala-style mixed repertory program featuring both classic and contemporary ballet. For the grand finale, the company will perform its premiere rendition of George Balanchine’s “Theme and Variations.” The production opens with a preview tomorrow night at 7:30 and runs through Friday at The Kennedy Center.

Music: “Roshambo [Instrumental]” by Keller Williams/The String Cheese Incident

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