WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 16

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Katie Miller, Youth in a Party Hat, 2013, oil on panel, 34 x 23 inches.
Katie Miller
Katie Miller, Youth in a Party Hat, 2013, oil on panel, 34 x 23 inches.

Katie Miller, Youth in a Party Hat, 2013, oil on panel, 34 x 23 inches. (CONNERSMITH)

Apr. 17-27: Filmfest DC
After nearly three decades of bringing award-winning movies to local cinephiles, Filmfest DC returns tomorrow for its final year. The program includes more than 80 features, documentaries, comedies, shorts and more that will screen in venues throughout the area. WAMU 88.5 is a media sponsor for Filmfest DC, which runs through April 27.

Apr. 16-May 31: Enduring & Alive and Present
You can head to CONNERSMITH, an art gallery in Northeast, through May 31 to see two solo exhibits. Enduring features new oil paintings by Katie Miller, who depicts children in bright colors and with accessories such as toys, beads, costumes and electronic gadgets. But, while the kids and their props are modern, the poses are reminiscent of portraits from the past. In Alive and Present, Dutch artist Agniet Snoep shows off a series of photographs inspired by the still life tradition in the Dutch Golden Age of painting.

Music: “Rizzle Kicks - Mama Do The Hump (Instrumental Version)” by Tribute Stars

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MTV's Rewinding The '90s With A New Channel

The '90s are back! Pokémon has taken over the world again. A Clinton is running for president. And now, MTV is reviving '90s favorites like Beavis and Butt-head on a new channel, MTV Classic.
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Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
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The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

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Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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