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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 4

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Mr. TOL E. RAncE will be followed by a free, post-performance discussion.
Photo by Christopher Duggan
Mr. TOL E. RAncE will be followed by a free, post-performance discussion.

Apr. 5-6: Mr. Tol E. RAncE
This weekend you can head to Atlas Performing Arts Center in Northeast to see Mr. Tol E. RAncE, a piece by dancer and choreographer Camille A. Brown that explores identity and the origins of minstrelsy. The work is inspired by the themes of Spike Lee’s 2002 film Bamboozled and Mel Watkins’ book On the Real Side: From Slavery to Chris Rock. You can check it out tomorrow night at 8 or Sunday at 3 p.m.

Apr. 4-27: REVOLUTION: Art & Technology
The exhibit REVOLUTION: Art & Technology opens today at Del Ray Artisans in Alexandria, where it will be on view through April 27. The show explores artists’ relationships with technology through computer-created and digitally manipulated art, mixed-media pieces, paintings, collage and 3-D art made from electronic parts. There will be an opening reception tonight from 7 to 10 p.m. A round table discussion on using technology to promote art will be held on April 12.

Music: “Back in the day (instrumental)” by Erykah Badu

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