WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, March 20

Play associated audio
The Capital City Symphony with Conductor Victoria Gau in concert at the Atlas Performing Arts Center.
Capital City Symphony
The Capital City Symphony with Conductor Victoria Gau in concert at the Atlas Performing Arts Center.

Mar. 20-29: The Elixir of Love
Washington National Opera presents a revival of Gaetano Donizetti’s romantic comedy The Elixir of Love. The opera follows a handsome peasant who falls for a woman who's out of his league. But, with the help of what he believes to be a magic potion, he just might be able to win her affections. The show opens tonight and runs through March 29 in The Kennedy Center Opera House. Directed by Stephen Lawless, the production will be conducted by newcomer Ward Stare.

Mar. 23: Capital City Symphony American Musicfest Part I
This Sunday at 5 p.m. you can head to the Atlas Performing Arts Center in Northeast to hear Capital City Symphony perform a concert of contemporary American classical music. The program includes two pieces by D.C.-based composers Scott Pender and Steven Gerber, who will answer questions in a post-concert Q&A session.

Music: “L’elisir d’amore (The Elixir of Love): Udite, udite, o rustici (Orchestral Backing Track Karaoke Version)” by Compagnia d’Opera Italiana Orchestra and Antonello Gotta

NPR

MTV's Rewinding The '90s With A New Channel

The '90s are back! Pokémon has taken over the world again. A Clinton is running for president. And now, MTV is reviving '90s favorites like Beavis and Butt-head on a new channel, MTV Classic.
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.