Art Beat With Lauren Landau, March 19 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, March 19

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"Forgotten Survivor" Ibrahim Essa is shown amidst crumbling structures in Palestine.
The Jerusalem Fund Gallery Al-Quds
"Forgotten Survivor" Ibrahim Essa is shown amidst crumbling structures in Palestine.

Mar. 19-Apr. 6: Exposed DC Photography Show
The 8th annual Exposed DC Photography Show opens today and will be on display at Long View Gallery in Northwest through April 6. The juried exhibit features nearly 50 images of the D.C. area that were chosen for their portrayal of the region, not as a political hotspot or tourist destination, but as a place where real people live, work and love. There will be an opening reception tonight from 6 to 10 p.m. featuring local food, beer and wine.

Mar. 21-Apr. 25: Portraits of Denial and Desire
Starting this Friday you can visit The Jerusalem Fund Gallery Al-Quds in Northwest to see Portraits of Denial and Desire, Photographs by John Halaka. The body of work documents the lives of Palestinian refugees, who Halaka says “have become the forgotten survivors of the world” through systematic silence and neglect. You can check it out through April 25.

Music: “Daret El2ayam” by Shafek Kabaha

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