Art Beat With Lauren Landau, March 19 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, March 19

Play associated audio
"Forgotten Survivor" Ibrahim Essa is shown amidst crumbling structures in Palestine.
The Jerusalem Fund Gallery Al-Quds
"Forgotten Survivor" Ibrahim Essa is shown amidst crumbling structures in Palestine.

Mar. 19-Apr. 6: Exposed DC Photography Show
The 8th annual Exposed DC Photography Show opens today and will be on display at Long View Gallery in Northwest through April 6. The juried exhibit features nearly 50 images of the D.C. area that were chosen for their portrayal of the region, not as a political hotspot or tourist destination, but as a place where real people live, work and love. There will be an opening reception tonight from 6 to 10 p.m. featuring local food, beer and wine.

Mar. 21-Apr. 25: Portraits of Denial and Desire
Starting this Friday you can visit The Jerusalem Fund Gallery Al-Quds in Northwest to see Portraits of Denial and Desire, Photographs by John Halaka. The body of work documents the lives of Palestinian refugees, who Halaka says “have become the forgotten survivors of the world” through systematic silence and neglect. You can check it out through April 25.

Music: “Daret El2ayam” by Shafek Kabaha

NPR

For This Puzzle, Watch Your Words

The challenge is a game of categories based on the word "watch." For each category provided, name something starting with each of the letters W-A-T-C-H.
NPR

Cheez Whiz Helped Spread Processed Foods. Will It Be Squeezed Out?

Turns out, the history of Kraft's dull-orange cheese spread says a lot about the processed food industry — and where it might be headed as Kraft and Heinz merge.
NPR

Indiana Governor: Lawmakers To 'Clarify' Anti-Gay Law

Mike Pence, who signed the controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act last week, says he didn't anticipate the level of hostility the law has engendered.
NPR

App That Aims To Make Books 'Squeaky Clean' Draws Ire From Edited Writers

Clean Reader — an app designed to find, block and replace profanity in books — has drawn considerable criticism from authors. This week, makers of the app announced they would no longer sell e-books.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.