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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, February 21

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Mark Morris Dance Group dancers Jenn Weddel and Spencer Ramirez perform "Jenn and Spencer."
Photo by Stephanie Berger
Mark Morris Dance Group dancers Jenn Weddel and Spencer Ramirez perform "Jenn and Spencer."

Feb. 21-Mar. 29: The Hero and the Villain
The Hero and the Villain, an installation by Baltimore-based artist Cindy Cheng, goes on view today at CulturalDC's Flashpoint Gallery, where you can check it out through March 29. By juxtaposing drawings with everyday objects such as bottle caps, orange peels and rocks, the artist attempts to compare and contrast the mythology of heroes and villains, their transformative journeys, and their impact on the land. An opening reception will be held tonight from 6 to 8.

Feb. 22-23: Mark Morris Dance Group
You can see the Mark Morris Dance Group perform at George Mason University’s Center for the Arts in Fairfax this Saturday and Sunday. The program includes the D.C. area premieres of three works: “A Wooden Tree,” “Jenn and Spencer” and “Crosswalk.” There will be a discussion 45 minutes prior to each performance. Those talks are free to ticketholders.

Music: “Suite for Violin and Piano - VI. Presto” by Henry Cowell

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