Art Beat With Lauren Landau, February 17 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, February 17

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Glass artist David Barnes communicated back-and-forth with pastel and mixed media artist Lynn Goldstein to create pieces such as this one, titled "Heat."
Photo courtesy of Workhouse Arts Center
Glass artist David Barnes communicated back-and-forth with pastel and mixed media artist Lynn Goldstein to create pieces such as this one, titled "Heat."

Feb. 17: Portrait of America
Art, science and technology intersect in David Datuna’s Portrait of America, the first work of art to incorporate “Google Glass” technology. Today is your last chance to see the 12-foot multi-media American flag collage, which, when viewed through the high-tech spectacles, unveils hidden layers of information about the people whose portraits are included in the work. Datuna says the piece is about American history and his life story. The installation is on display at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery.

Feb. 17-Mar. 30: Reflection and Response
You can see a new exhibit at Workhouse Arts Center in Lorton through March 30 that features work by Virginia artists David Barnes and Lynn Goldstein, who work with glass and pastels, respectively. The pieces included in Reflection and Response are the result of a collaborative effort by the pair.

Music: “Future Reflections (Instrumental)” by MGMT

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