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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, February 6

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Feb. 6-Mar. 9: Richard III
William Shakespeare’s plays have been translated, reinterpreted and revamped in countless performances. This month you can see just how versatile his work can be by seeing the same play, Richard III, in two completely different productions. For the first time, Folger Theatre has reconfigured its theater for in-the-round seating so that audiences can get right up in the action as the cunning Richard schemes his way to the top. Directed by Robert Richmond, the show will be on stage through March 9.

Feb. 6-23: Richard III
In NextStop Theatre’s presentation of Richard III, the ruthless villain is re-imagined as a Deaf man, seeking power in a hearing world. Directed by Lindsey D. Snyder, the play is set in England after a long civil war. But while the country is at peace, King Edward IV’s youngest brother Richard is resentful of the happiness around him and plots a bloody pathway to the throne. You can see the performance at Industrial Strength Theatre in Herndon through February 23.

Music: “Villain (feat. Styles P and Ariez Onasis) (Instrumental)” by J. Cardim


Christopher Marlowe Credited As Shakespeare's Co-Author On Henry VI Plays

True authorship of Shakespeare has been debated for centuries. Now, the New Oxford Shakespeare edition will list Elizabethan playwright Christopher Marlowe as co-author on the three Henry VI plays, part one, two and three. NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Florida State University professor Gary Taylor, one of the general editors of the new volume.

2,500 Years Ago, This Brew Was Buried With The Dead; A Brewery Has Revived It

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20 Years Later, Humans Still No Match For Computers On The Chessboard

IBM's Deep Blue beat chess great Garry Kasparov in 1997. Humans and computers play the game differently, but have computers taught humans much about the game?

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