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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, February 3

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The touring company of STOMP comes to D.C. this week.
Steve McNicholas
The touring company of STOMP comes to D.C. this week.

Feb. 3-23: Violet
You can see Violet at Ford's Theatre through February 23. Set in the early 1960s, this musical by Brian Crawley follows a young woman on a pilgrimage across the South to meet a televangelist who she hopes can heal the disfiguring scar that has marred her face since childhood. Director Jeff Calhoun says it's "probably the most sophisticated material" he's ever worked with.

"It's a classic having to leave home to actually discover yourself story," he says. "It's about forgiveness and self-discovery and really explores like our country, how obsessed we are with what people look like."

Feb. 4-9: STOMP
You'd be surprised how many everyday items can be repurposed as instruments. Starting tomorrow you can see and hear paint cans, shopping carts and plumbing fixtures in a whole new way in STOMP. The internationally-acclaimed percussive performance will be on stage at The National Theatre through Sunday.

Music: "Blues Stomp" by The James Taylor Quartet

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