WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Filed Under:

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, January 30

Play associated audio
IMPOSSIBLE! A Happenstance Circus relies on imagination to take audiences on a whimsical tour of classic sideshow acts.
Photo by Leslie McConnaughey
IMPOSSIBLE! A Happenstance Circus relies on imagination to take audiences on a whimsical tour of classic sideshow acts.

Jan. 30-Feb. 16: Figures and Vistas
It’s not too late to see Figures and Vistas, an exhibit featuring work by local artists Gordon Binder and Joyce McCarten. The collection is on view at Gallery Plan b in Northwest through February 16 and features a combination of paintings and drawings. Binder focuses on urban themes in his oil paintings and pen and ink drawings as he explores architecture and dense city centers. Conversely, McCarten chooses to highlight more pastoral scenery with charcoal drawings and colorful landscapes.

Jan. 31-Feb. 9: IMPOSSIBLE! A Happenstance Circus
Starting tomorrow you can head to Round House Theatre in Silver Spring to see IMPOSSIBLE! A Happenstance Circus. This theatrical new show by Happenstance Theater incorporates classic circus characters and imagery from the 1930s and 1940s as actors use their imaginations to paint a scene of life under the big top.

Music: “Circus of Life, Pt. 2: Freakshow [Instrumental]” by Magic Pie

NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
NPR

At The Democratic Convention, Choreographing A Sea Of Signs

Watch even a few minutes and you're bound to see some synchronized sign-holding — brightly colored placards with slogans like "Stronger Together" waving in the crowd.
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.