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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, December 5

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The Magic Flute first premiered in Vienna in 1791, just three months after Mozart's death. You can see the opera this week at GMU's Center for the Arts.
Photo courtesy of Virginia Opera
The Magic Flute first premiered in Vienna in 1791, just three months after Mozart's death. You can see the opera this week at GMU's Center for the Arts.

Dec. 5-6: Ballet Hispanico
Latino dance organization Ballet Hispanico returns to The Kennedy Center tonight and tomorrow at 8 p.m. for the first time since 2007. The mixed repertory program includes works by four choreographers and live music by Grammy Award-winning artist Paquito D’Rivera. After tonight’s show, there will be a free Explore the Arts discussion with a moderator and members of the company.

Dec. 6-7: The Magic Flute
This Friday and Saturday you can head to George Mason University’s Center for the Arts in Fairfax to hear and see the Virginia Opera perform Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's final opera, The Magic Flute. The Virginia Symphony Orchestra will provide musical accompaniment to this fairytale about the triumph of good over evil as a prince and his bird-catching friend encounter magicians, spirits and terrifying creatures in their effort to rescue a damsel in distress.

Music: “Tango azul” by Mantovani

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