WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, October 29

Brooklyn Mack and Maki Onuki star in The Washington Ballet's performance of Giselle.
Photo by Steve Vaccariello
Brooklyn Mack and Maki Onuki star in The Washington Ballet's performance of Giselle.

Oct. 30-Nov. 17: I Am My Own Wife
Starting tomorrow, Rep Stage presents I Am My Own Wife, the 2004 Pulitzer and Tony Award-winning play by Doug Wright. Based on a true story, the production tells the tale of Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, a German transvestite who survived both the Nazi and East German Communist regimes. You can see the show at the Horozwitz Visual and Performing Arts Center on the campus of Howard Community College through November 17.

Oct. 30-Nov. 3: Giselle
The Washington Ballet opens its 2013-2014 season tomorrow night at The Kennedy Center, where the company will be performing Giselle through November 3. After a peasant girl named Giselle is seduced by a nobleman in disguise, she’s robbed of her happiness and her life. But when the slighted maiden returns as a ghost, will she haunt or help the man who broke her heart?

Music: “Giselle Ballet Music, Act I: Polacca” by Mozarteum Orchestra Salzburg

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