WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, October 22

Shorty Lungkarta Tjungurrayi (1920-1987) Classic Pintupi Water Dreaming, c. 1972
Estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd
Shorty Lungkarta Tjungurrayi (1920-1987) Classic Pintupi Water Dreaming, c. 1972

Oct. 22-Jan. 31, 2014: icons of the desert
Some of the earliest and rarest paintings by Indigenous Australian artists are on view at the Embassy of Australia through January 31. Icons of the desert Curator Margo Smith says the works, which were created by Aboriginal religious leaders, depict sacred sites. “The shapes you see in the painting actually represent the landscape,” she says. “They’re almost like mythic maps and tell the stories of ancestral beings that created it.”

Oct. 22-Nov. 10: Go, Dog. Go!
You and your little ones can watch the children’s book Go, Dog. Go! by P.D. Eastman jump from the page to the stage at NextStop Theatre Company in Herndon. Directed by Ray Ficca, the play takes audiences into a musical world of doggy fun as pups of all shapes, colors and sizes sing, play and howl at the moon. But be sure to fetch your tickets soon; this weekends-only production closes on November 10.

Music: “Losing My Blues Tonight (Instrumental)” by Nev Molloy

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