WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, October 4

Irish-Latin band La Unica is one of the many musical acts performing at Adams Morgan PorchFest.
Photo provided by Cultural Tourism DC
Irish-Latin band La Unica is one of the many musical acts performing at Adams Morgan PorchFest.

Oct. 4-6: (e)merge art fair
You can support emerging artists and dozens of galleries from all over the world through Sunday at the (e)merge art fair at the Capitol Skyline Hotel. In addition to the range of artwork on display, there will also be numerous discussion panels, performances and art actions.

Oct. 5: PorchFest
Who needs a stage when you’ve got a stoop? Cultural Tourism DC and the Adams Morgan Partnership Business Improvement District present PorchFest from 2 to 6 p.m. tomorrow. Houses throughout the Adams Morgan neighborhood will open up their porches to local musicians who will perform for free during the family-friendly event.

Oct. 5: Columbia Heights Day
The 7th annual Columbia Heights Day will be held tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the Tubman Elementary Field in Northwest. The free festival will include a yoga workshop, petting zoo, bocce, live music and dance performances, a t-shirt screen printing station, and more.

Music: “My Neighbor Totoro (Violin Instrumental)” by Joe Hisaishi

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