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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, September 30

Playwright and director Rafael Abofalia directs the play CIFRAS by Mar González Glez.
Photo by Ignacio García-Bustelo
Playwright and director Rafael Abofalia directs the play CIFRAS by Mar González Glez.

Sept. 30: New Plays from Spain
Tonight at 7 you can see New Plays from Spain at the Former Residence of the Ambassador of Spain in Northwest. Presented by Studio Theatre, No Rules Theatre Company, Theatre Alliance, and SPAIN arts & culture, the event will feature staged readings in English of contemporary plays by three young, Spanish playwrights: Cristina Colmena, Emilio Williams and Mar Gómez Glez. There will be a post-performance discussion with the writers and directors, and while tickets to the show are free, seating is limited so be sure to RSVP online.

Sept. 30: The Great Goat Bubble
Solas Nua presents a free reading of Julian Gough’s economic satire, The Great Goat Bubble, tonight at 7 at the Warehouse Theater in Northwest. Jennifer Mendenhall directs the play, which is set in 1987 and centers on two characters, who hit it off while waiting for a train. As the men chat about life, goats and the free market, they hint at an unstable economic future.

Music: “Spanish Ladies” by Joshua Scotton

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