WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Filed Under:

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, September 25

Isabelle Anderson plays Titus Andronicus in this unique production by Taffety Punk's Riot Grrrls.
Photo by Marcus Kyd
Isabelle Anderson plays Titus Andronicus in this unique production by Taffety Punk's Riot Grrrls.

Sept. 27-Oct. 27: The Laramie Project
Matthew Gardiner directs The Laramie Project, which opens on Friday and runs through October 27 at the historic Ford’s Theatre. Based on a true story, the drama by Moisés Kaufman and Members of the Tectonic Theatre Project paints a complex portrait of a small community’s response to a vicious hate crime, the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard. The show is presented as part of The Lincoln Legacy Project, “an effort to generate dialogue around issues of tolerance, equality and acceptance.”

Sept. 28-Oct. 26: Titus Andronicus
One of Shakespeare’s bloodiest plays, Titus Andronicus, hits the stage at Capitol Hill Arts Workshop in Southeast this Saturday night. But this production by Taffety Punk Theatre Company’s Riot Grrrls isn’t your average show. An all-female cast takes on the roles of Titus, Marcus, Tamora and others in this tragedy about sacrifice, violence and revenge. You can see the show through October 26.

Music: “IMAGINE” by London Symphony Orchestra

NPR

Far From 'Infinitesimal': A Mathematical Paradox's Role In History

It seems like a simple question: How many parts can you divide a line into? The troublesome answer was square at the root of two of Europe's greatest social crises.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.