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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Sept. 2

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The Sleepy Kitty show at The Dunes starts at 8 p.m. on September 3.
Ted Barron
The Sleepy Kitty show at The Dunes starts at 8 p.m. on September 3.

Sept. 3: Sleepy Kitty
St. Louis-based indie-pop garage duo, Sleepy Kitty, is playing at The Dunes in Northwest tomorrow night. Front woman Paige Brubeck loops her vocals live while Evan Sult, the former drummer of rock band Harvey Danger, provides the beat. The pair's unique sound blends '90s post-punk with show-tunes and alternative rock.

Sept. 3-Oct. 27: The Art of Handwriting
You may be familiar with influential artists such as Georgia O'Keeffe, "Grandma Moses," and Alfred Stieglitz, but did you ever wonder what their handwriting looked like? The Smithsonian's Archives of American Art presents The Art of Handwriting, an exhibition featuring dozens of letters written by famous painters, photographers, sculptors, and other visual artists. Each letter is accompanied by an interpretation discussing how the penmanship of each artist corresponds to his or her signature style. You can check it out at the Lawrence A. Fleishmann Gallery through October 27. 

Music: "The Letter" by Nirvana Sitar & String Group


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

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