WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, August 15

Artists paint before a live audience during last year's Face Off event at Principle Gallery.
Photo by Suzanne Lago Arthur
Artists paint before a live audience during last year's Face Off event at Principle Gallery.

Aug. 16: Face Off
The Principle Gallery in Old Town Alexandria hosts Face Off tomorrow, starting at 6 p.m. The live painting demonstration will feature gallery artists Rachel Constantine, Cindy Procious, Terry Strickland and Mia Bergeron, who will each create work based on the same subject before an audience. Admittance to the second annual event is free, and this year’s subject will be live human form.

Aug. 16-Sept. 22: Miss Saigon
The heat is on in Arlington tomorrow, when Miss Saigon opens at Signature Theatre. Directed by Eric Schaeffer, the musical by Claude-Michel Schonberg, Alain Boublil and Richard Maltby Jr. tells the story of an American GI who falls in love with a Vietnamese bar girl during the throes of the Vietnam War, only to be torn apart and reunited years later. This modern adaptation of Giacomo Puccini’s Madame Butterfly will be on stage through September 22.

Music: “Peace Frog [Instrumental]” by The Doors

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