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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, August 6

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Steve Miller's Booming Demand (2012) was made using dispersion and silkscreen enamel on canvas. 
Photo courtesy of the National Academy of Sciences
Steve Miller's Booming Demand (2012) was made using dispersion and silkscreen enamel on canvas. 

Aug. 6-Jan. 13: Crossing the Line: Paintings by Steve Miller
You can see an exhibit that puts the “art” in “smart” through January 13 at the National Academy of Sciences Building in Northwest. In Crossing the Line: Paintings by Steve Miller, the artist combines photographic, drawn and silk-screened images with excerpts from the notebook of Nobel Prize-winning chemist Roderick MacKinnon. Miller regularly explores scientific themes in his work, and uses this collection to highlight the beauty of proteins.

Aug. 6-Sept. 1: Anything Goes
Alexandria’s Del Ray Artisans presents its 10th annual exhibit featuring work by members of the gallery’s Board of Directors. Each of the seven artists selected his or her own creative theme in Anything Goes, which includes sculpture, paintings and photographs. You can see the show through September 1.

Music: “We Are All Connected (Instrumental)” by Symphony of Science

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