WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, July 31

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"Cossack," a surreal oil painting by local artist Martin Swift, is just one of the works featured in Hot, Hot, Hot.
 
Photo courtesy of Foundry Gallery
  "Cossack," a surreal oil painting by local artist Martin Swift, is just one of the works featured in Hot, Hot, Hot.  

Jul. 31-Sept. 1: Hot, Hot, Hot
You can see a juried exhibit featuring work by nearly 20 local artists at The Foundry Gallery in Northwest, where Hot, Hot, Hot opens today. Watercolors, oil and acrylic paintings converge with drawings and mixed media art in this eclectic selection of work that includes everything from traditional Chinese brush painting, to the abstract and the surreal, to a highly-detailed pencil portrait. You can check it out through September 1.

Jul. 30-Aug. 31: Hydrotherapy
Feeling the heat? You can dive into an exhibit of small paintings by Brooklyn-based artist Elizabeth Huey at D.C.’s Heiner Contemporary through August 31. In Hydrotherapy, the artist trades sanitariums and institutions for resort spas, treatment centers and secluded getaways as she explores the connection between the human psyche and community, architecture and nature.

Music: “When the Water Whispers (Instrumental)” by Flight Brigade

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