WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, July 26

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Artist Martin Swift poses with three of the oil paintings featured in his Paradox of Masculinity exhibit.
Photo by Kate Warren
Artist Martin Swift poses with three of the oil paintings featured in his Paradox of Masculinity exhibit.

Jul. 26-Aug. 22: Paradox of Masculinity
In Paradox of Masculinity figurative painter Martin Swift aims to start a conversation on gender identity and societal stereotypes. “The norm I guess is this idea of the ideal man, you know, the athletic, stoic, silent man who is powerful.” Swift says the models portrayed in his life-sized nude portraits are all close friends who fit their own definitions of what it means to be a man. “I’m trying to sort of strip away this facade of masculinity and show the vulnerability of men.” You can see the exhibit through August 22 at Above the Bike Shop in Adams Morgan.

Jul. 26-Dec. 1: “High Art,” “Searching for Goldilocks” & “Suited for Space”
Three exhibits open at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum today, and run through December 1. High Art: A Decade of Collecting presents 50 works covering a range of styles, while Suited for Space traces the development of the spacesuit. Angela Palmer’s sculpture Searching for Goldilocks is made of 18 sheets of glass, engraved with circles representing stars.

Music: “Boys Don’t Cry” by Vitamin String Quartet

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