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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, June 17

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In Jealousy of Clouds, artist Jayme McLellan focuses her lens on the skies.
Photo by Jayme McLellan
In Jealousy of Clouds, artist Jayme McLellan focuses her lens on the skies.

Jun. 17-Jul. 27: Jealousy of Clouds
Heiner Contemporary in Northwest presents Jealousy of Clouds, a solo exhibition of photography, video, and installation by D.C.-based artist Jayme McLellan. The exhibit centers on a Buddhist fable about a stream that is jealous of the clouds and chases them, wanting to keep them for itself. McLellan uses text, photos and video to represent the story, and invites viewers to meditate on the beauty and connectedness of the natural world. You can see the work through July 27.

Jun. 17-28: Acrylics, Wood Sculpture and Mixed Media
You can head to BlackRock Center for the Arts in Germantown through June 28 to see an exhibit of acrylics, wood sculpture and mixed media by three artists. Sculptor Mike Shaffer draws inspiration from vertical objects such as rock formations and office buildings, while painter Anne Marchand says she focuses on “forces of nature and the mysterious inner lives of human beings.” Mixed media artist Mark Sharp is influenced by outdoor elements such as land and sky.

Music: “Flying Cloud [Instrumental]” by The Doobie Brothers

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