WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Filed Under:

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, June 14

Play associated audio

In Anything Goes, a loud-mouthed showgirl and a novice broker embark on a maritime journey to true love.
Photo by Joan Marcus
In Anything Goes, a loud-mouthed showgirl and a novice broker embark on a maritime journey to true love.

Jun. 14-Jul. 7: Anything Goes
The Kennedy Center presents Roundabout Theatre Company’s Anything Goes, a new Broadway revival of Cole Porter’s 1934 musical comedy. When lovers, liars and booze-swigging socialites set sail on a trans-atlantic cruise, they break out of their shells and into song. Featuring classic hits such as “I Get a Kick Out of You,” “It’s De-Lovely” and “You’re the Top,” this 2011 Tony Award-winner is on stage through July 7.

Jun. 15: Reel Water Film Festival
You can head to Bethesda Blues and Jazz Supper Club tomorrow for the second annual Reel Water Film Festival, a non-profit event that aims to educate people about local and global water issues. At 2 p.m., the festival will screen more than 50 short films on topics ranging from wild weather to the accessibility of clean water. Then at 7:15 p.m. you can see the event’s feature film, Chasing Ice, an award-winning documentary that shows the rapid disintegration of the world’s glaciers.

Music: “Entr’ Acte” by Cole Porter

NPR

MTV's Rewinding The '90s With A New Channel

The '90s are back! Pokémon has taken over the world again. A Clinton is running for president. And now, MTV is reviving '90s favorites like Beavis and Butt-head on a new channel, MTV Classic.
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.