WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, May 6

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Daniel Flint takes the stage in The Golem, a twisted tale that bends time and logic.
Taffety Punk Theatre Company
Daniel Flint takes the stage in The Golem, a twisted tale that bends time and logic.

May 6-18: The Golem
Taffety Punk Theatre Company presents The Golem, a modern interpretation of the 1915 novel by Gustav Meyrink. Adapted by and starring Daniel Flint, this dreamlike production takes audiences on one man's journey through madness, murder, and unrequited love. Flint says, "Each character is a facet of ourselves, maybe a little broken mirror or prism into our psyche, into our dark side, into our light side, into all the different parts of us that make us up. And what the play is about is sort of about trying to learn how to integrate those things together." The one-man play is performed to live music and runs through May 18 at the Capitol Hill Arts Workshop.

May 6-Jun. 1: The Full Monty
You can see the uproarious musical The Full Monty through June 1 at The Keegan Theatre in Dupont Circle. This Americanized version of the 1997 British film follows six men who are struggling to make ends meet, until they concoct a bold plan that might just save their behinds.

Music: "Madness" by Muse from The 2nd Law: The Instrumentals

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