Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 10 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 10

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King Arthur and Patsy encounter the dreaded Knights Who Say Ni.
Spamalot
King Arthur and Patsy encounter the dreaded Knights Who Say Ni.

Apr. 10-14: Spamalot
The three-time Tony Award-winning play Spamalot returns to D.C. today. Based off the 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, the musical comedy follows King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table as they embark on a journey to find a legendary chalice.  Along the way, they meet a host of characters, including a blood-thirsty rabbit, and a very strange group of forest-dwelling knights. You can see the play at The National Theatre through April 14.

Apr. 12-14: Lysistrata
The phrase "make love, not war" is taken literally in Lysistrata: A Sex Comedy. It's wartime in Greece and the women have had enough, so they decide to take matters into their own hands, and bedrooms, by going on a sex strike. You can see The Maryland Shakespeare Players perform the ancient anti-war comedy at The University of Maryland this Friday at 4 p.m., on Saturday at 1 and 8 p.m., or on Sunday at 1.

Music: "Bump (instrumental)" by Spank Rock

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