WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, March 19

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Harvest of Empire explores the triumphs, contributions and sacrifices made by the United States' growing Latino community, and delves into some of the push factors behind this surge in immigration.
Jimmy Felter
Harvest of Empire explores the triumphs, contributions and sacrifices made by the United States' growing Latino community, and delves into some of the push factors behind this surge in immigration.

Mar. 19: Jewel Greatest Hits Tour
Music is good for the soul, and tonight you can head to George Washington University's Lisner Auditorium for the Jewel Greatest Hits Tour. The award-winning musician behind such 90s hits as "Who Will Save Your Soul," "You Were Meant For Me," and "Foolish Games" will start playing at 8 p.m.

Mar. 19-28: Harvest of Empire
Harvest of Empire is now showing at Regal Majestic Stadium 20 in Silver Spring through March 28. Based on the book by journalist Juan Gonzalez, the feature-length documentary tells the "untold story of Latinos in America" by exploring how U.S. economic and military interests created a climate in Latin America that led to an increase in immigration to the U.S. Presented by Onyx Films and directed by Peter Getzels and Eduardo Lopez, the film provides a fresh perspective on the current debate over immigration.

Music: "Who Will Save Your Soul" by Vitamin String Quartet

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Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
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Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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