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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Feb. 27

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In Seven Points (part one), contemporary artist Marley Dawson incorporates tumbleweed in his moving sculpture, which meditates on the passing of time.
Lauren Landau
In Seven Points (part one), contemporary artist Marley Dawson incorporates tumbleweed in his moving sculpture, which meditates on the passing of time.

Feb. 27-Apr. 12: Seven Points (part one)
Seven Points (part one) features work by three Australians whose experiences abroad influenced their art. Marley Dawson's kinetic sculpture incorporates tumbleweed, which is often associated with North America, while Anna Kristensen's paintings depict native Australian flowers in traditional Japanese arrangements. In Angelica Mesiti's video art, an Algerian street musician performs an Arabic version of "Hotel California" in a Parisian nightclub. You can see the first installment of Seven Points through April 12 in the gallery at the Embassy of Australia, which is open to the public from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on weekdays.

Feb. 27-Mar. 9: I Too Sing America: The Life and Poetry of Langston Hughes
The life and legacy of an iconic American poet is explored on stage in I Too Sing America: The Life and Poetry of Langston Hughes, a new play presented by the Howard University Department of Theatre Arts. You can catch the show through March 9 in the Ira Aldridge Theater.

Music: "Beads, Things & Flowers [Instrumental Version]" by St. Germain

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