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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Feb. 8

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Jimmy Miracle's solo show at Flashpoint Gallery features photographs of installations that the artist painstakingly assembled on a beach using materials that he found there.
CulturalDC
Jimmy Miracle's solo show at Flashpoint Gallery features photographs of installations that the artist painstakingly assembled on a beach using materials that he found there.

Feb. 8-Mar. 9: Wearing Ethereal
Starting today you can check out a new series of photographs and sculptures by local artist Jimmy Miracle. Wearing Ethereal will be up through March 9 at CulturalDC's Flashpoint Gallery. The exhibit features a dozen photos of installations that the artist crafted on a beach using discarded materials, such as bottle caps, plastic cutlery, and feathers.  There will be an opening reception tonight from 6 to 8 p.m.

Feb. 8-9: Mark Morris Dance Group
At 8 p.m. tonight and tomorrow you can see the Mark Morris Dance Group on stage at George Mason University's Center for the Arts. The performances mark the D.C.-area premieres of three pieces of choreography: "The Office," "Socrates" and "Festival Dance." And if you arrive 45 minutes early, ticket holders can attend a free pre-performance discussion.

Music: "The Emperor of Wyoming (Instrumental)" by Neil Young 

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