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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Feb. 6

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In Habibi, Qays (left) paints lines from the classical poem Majnun Layla on the walls of his town after he is prohibited from marrying the woman he loves.
Human Rights Watch Film Festival
In Habibi, Qays (left) paints lines from the classical poem Majnun Layla on the walls of his town after he is prohibited from marrying the woman he loves.

Feb. 7: Ensembles of Afghanistan National Institute of Music
Tomorrow night you can enjoy a concert by students from the Afghanistan National Institute of Music at The Kennedy Center's Millennium Stage. The free event starts at 6 p.m. and will include traditional Afghan and Indian music, plus William Harvey's The Four Seasons of Afghanistan, which was inspired by Vivaldi's world-famous violin concertos. 

Feb. 6: Habibi
The D.C. Human Rights Watch Film Festival kicks off tonight at West End Cinema with a special screening of Habibi by filmmaker Susan Youssef. The movie tells the story of two university students who must return to their neighborhood in Gaza, where tradition and religion reign supreme. When the couple is forbidden from marrying, the young man graffitis lines from a classic love poem on the walls of their town, which angers his girlfriend's father and the local morality police. A Q&A session will follow the film, which starts at 7 p.m.

Music: "Pashtu" by Aziz Herawi

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