Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Jan. 29 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Jan. 29

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Ladies Swing the Blues brings together the singing styles of jazz legends like Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Peggy Lee and Billie Holiday.
Chris Banks
Ladies Swing the Blues brings together the singing styles of jazz legends like Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Peggy Lee and Billie Holiday.

Jan. 29-Mar. 17: Ladies Swing the Blues
It's 1955, and when a bebop icon suddenly passes away, the royalty of New York City's jazz scene gather at the famous Birdland club, where they discuss his impact and their own contributions to the genre they love. Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker and more are reincarnated in Ladies Swing the Blues, a musical tale of love, loss, talent and passion. You can swing back through time in this MetroStage production through March 17.

Jan. 30-Feb. 23: Rough | Smooth | Evolving & Shadows
Two new exhibits, Rough | Smooth | Evolving and Shadows, go on display tomorrow at Studio Gallery in Northwest D.C. Sculptor Trish Palasik experiments with texture in her three-dimensional figures, while photographer Peter Karp plays with light. Both of their works will be up through February 23, and there will be a joint reception this Friday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Music: "Cool Blues" by Charlie Parker

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