Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Dec. 11 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Dec. 11

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"Human Era" blends faces and expressions with a burst of color.
Christopher Grady
"Human Era" blends faces and expressions with a burst of color.

Dec. 11-Dec. 16: The Holiday Guys
So a Jewish guy with a guitar and a Christian dude wielding a ukulele walk onto a stage where they proceed to blend Hebrew prayers with "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen". That's not a joke, it's an actual performance opening tonight at Signature Theatre and running through Sunday. You can check out The Holiday Guys as they wish you a "Happy Merry Hanu-mas!" with their non-traditional cabaret of seasonal songs, stories and silliness.

Dec. 11-Dec. 22: "Human Era"
For a pop of color you can head over to Foundation Gallery & Liveroom to see "Human Era," a new exhibition by local artist Christopher Grady. The collection of collage and acrylic works takes the traditional portrait and turns it on its head with bold stripes of color across the subjects' faces.

Dec. 11: UMD Korean Percussion Ensemble
Tonight the beats of Korea will fill the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center as the University of Maryland Korean Percussion Ensemble performs a free concert. You can feel the rhythm starting at 7:30 p.m.

Music: "Invierno" by Natalia Lafourcade

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