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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Nov. 30

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In Space Junk, dancers use movement to explore how past thoughts and experiences can be compared to orbital trash.
Rebollar Dance
In Space Junk, dancers use movement to explore how past thoughts and experiences can be compared to orbital trash.

Dec. 1: Great American Square Dance Revival
Why not start December dancing? Tomorrow night you can grab your partner and do-si-do at St. Stephens Church in Northwest DC. The Great American Square Dance Revival starts at 8:30 p.m. and will feature a live string band. Admission is only five dollars, and no experience is necessary. A professional caller will be there to teach you the steps!

Dec. 1-2: Rebollar Dance: Space Junk
If you'd rather leave the dancing to the professionals, you can head over to CityDance Studio Theater at Strathmore to see Rebollar Dance perform Space Junk. Choreographer and Director Erica Rebollar created the modern dance piece, which explores the inner world of the subjective mind and the outer realm of the objective universe.

Nov. 30: Lar Lubovitch Dance Company
Tonight you can go to The Kennedy Center to see the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company perform The Legend of Ten, Little Rhapsodies, Crisis Variations, and Transparent Things starting at 8 p.m.

Music: "Cheek to cheek" by Gonzalo Borgognoni

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