WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Nov. 7

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"Golden Beetle" is just one of more than 60 works of sculpture featured in DC artist Joan Danziger's latest exhibit, Inside The Underworld.
Photo courtesy of Joan Danziger
"Golden Beetle" is just one of more than 60 works of sculpture featured in DC artist Joan Danziger's latest exhibit, Inside The Underworld.

Nov. 7-Dec. 16: Joan Danziger
They creep, they crawl, and they're all over the walls. You can come to the American University Museum to see local artist Joan Danziger's latest exhibit, Inside the Underworld, which explores the magical realm of beetles. The collection of ornately-decorated beetle sculptures is up through December 16th, and there will be a gallery talk this Saturday with museum curator Jack Rasmussen, who will discuss the exhibit's deeper meaning.

Nov. 9-18th: Heartstrings and Shoestrings: Stories of Love and Woe
If you've been bitten by the love bug, you might enjoy "Heartstrings & Shoestrings--Stories of Love and Woe." The music and dance event is presented by UpRooted Dance with choreography by Keira Hart-Mendoza and music by violinist David Schulman. You can catch the show at Takoma Park's Dance Exchange through November 18th.

Music: "Fergie-Clumsy" by Karaoke

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