WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Nov. 7

Play associated audio
"Golden Beetle" is just one of more than 60 works of sculpture featured in DC artist Joan Danziger's latest exhibit, Inside The Underworld.
Photo courtesy of Joan Danziger
"Golden Beetle" is just one of more than 60 works of sculpture featured in DC artist Joan Danziger's latest exhibit, Inside The Underworld.

Nov. 7-Dec. 16: Joan Danziger
They creep, they crawl, and they're all over the walls. You can come to the American University Museum to see local artist Joan Danziger's latest exhibit, Inside the Underworld, which explores the magical realm of beetles. The collection of ornately-decorated beetle sculptures is up through December 16th, and there will be a gallery talk this Saturday with museum curator Jack Rasmussen, who will discuss the exhibit's deeper meaning.

Nov. 9-18th: Heartstrings and Shoestrings: Stories of Love and Woe
If you've been bitten by the love bug, you might enjoy "Heartstrings & Shoestrings--Stories of Love and Woe." The music and dance event is presented by UpRooted Dance with choreography by Keira Hart-Mendoza and music by violinist David Schulman. You can catch the show at Takoma Park's Dance Exchange through November 18th.

Music: "Fergie-Clumsy" by Karaoke

NPR

National Museum of African American History Opens Its Doors

More than 100 years after it was originally proposed, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is opening its doors in Washington, D.C.
NPR

While Everyone Was Partying At Woodstock, I Was Stuck At Schrafft's

The chain restaurant that catered to women helped redefine how Americans eat, according to a new book. For NPR's Lynn Neary, it also defined how she did and didn't fit with the counterculture.
NPR

Newspaper Endorsements Matter Most When They're Unexpected

The New York Times endorsed Hillary Clinton on Saturday, but an endorsement that came the day before from a smaller paper may matter more to its readers, for the simple fact that it was unexpected.
NPR

As Our Jobs Are Automated, Some Say We'll Need A Guaranteed Basic Income

How will the economy provide economic opportunities if employers need fewer workers in the future? A growing number of people in Silicon Valley are saying the only realistic answer is a basic income.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.