WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Sept. 20

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Anil Revri's 'Wall for Peace' asks 'Why can't we all just get along?' at Dulles.
Anil Revri
Anil Revri's 'Wall for Peace' asks 'Why can't we all just get along?' at Dulles.

(Sept. 20-Oct. 21) An Enemy of the People
Arthur Miller's An Enemy of the People is playing at Baltimore's Centerstage through mid-October. The master playwright's take on Henrik Ibsen's classic asks whether the good of some outweighs the good of the rest.

(Sept. 20-March 31) Wall for Peace
The next time you're at Dulles you can appreciate a monument to the good in everyone. D.C. artist Anil Revri's Wall for Peace is situated at the junction of concourses A and B through the end of March. The monolith is a block of scrolling LED lights that displays calls for peace from the texts of Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Sikhism.

(Sept. 21-23) Cavernous dance
Washington's Dana Tai Soon Burgess & Company typically focuses on characters or spirits on journeys, but it's dancing to a different tune to close out its 20th anniversary season: Caverns explores the topic of memory all weekend at George Washington University's Dorothy Betts Marvin Theatre in Northwest.  If that doesn't sound very memorable to you, a few of the company's classic character studies will be thrown in for good measure.

Music: "An Owl with Knees" by The Books

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