WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Sept. 12

Play associated audio
London-based Shakespeare's Globe crosses the pond to bring Hamlet to the Folger.
Shakespeare's Globe
London-based Shakespeare's Globe crosses the pond to bring Hamlet to the Folger.

(Sept. 13-Oct. 28) The Government Inspector
Washington’s Shakespeare Theatre Company kicks off its latest season tomorrow with what’s widely considered one of the funniest Russian plays ever written. Nikolai Gogol’s The Government Inspector will be the first Russian production to be presented on the Company’s stages. Gogol’s satire of provincial bureaucracy follows a close-to-broke civil servant as he travels to a small town where he’s mistaken for an incognito inspector.

(Sept. 12-22) To see or not to see?
The Folger Shakespeare Library is opening its new season with some actual Shakespeare. London-based Shakespeare’s Globe crosses the pond to present a stripped-down take on Hamlet through late September.

(Sept. 15-Oct. 6) Anna Bolena
Hamlet isn’t the only game in town when it comes to tragedies: The Washington National Opera welcomes a fresh season of productions with Anna Bolena at The Kennedy Center Saturday. A nasty king plots against his queen in Gaetano Donizetti’s classic Italian libretto.

Music: “Giles Farnaby's Dream” by Penguin Cafe Orchestra


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
WAMU 88.5

World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.