Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Aug 9 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Aug 9

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Shark Week comes a touch early to the District.
James Cullum
Shark Week comes a touch early to the District.

(Aug. 11) Save the Date
D.C. artist Kathryn Cornelius is about to turn 34. She’s unwed, and she’s about to take matters into her own hands. In her case, that means marrying and divorcing seven suitors - both men and women - in one day. You’re invited. And there will be cake. Save the Date explores the life cycle of modern marriage and divorce Saturday from 10 to 5 at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Northwest. By marriage number seven, Cornelius hopes to get to the bottom of all the private emotion, public spectacle, social expectation, and state power involved in the ritual.

(Aug. 10) Shark Week
The Discovery Channel’s Shark Week isn’t until next week, but D.C. has a local version if you can’t wait. Ours is a garage rock band with a bluesy surf rock sound. In typical D.C. fashion, Shark Week the band is made up of a reporter, a lawyer, and a hair salon owner. The motley crew celebrates the release of its latest hip-shaking EP with a show Friday night at Montserrat House in Northwest Washington.

Music: “Seen Your Video” by The Replacements

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