WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Aug 7

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Scenes of Sublime Rupture are showing at Alexandria's Target Gallery.
Benjamin Duke
Scenes of Sublime Rupture are showing at Alexandria's Target Gallery.

(Aug. 7-Sept. 2) Chaos Theory
Benjamin Duke went from being a painting enthusiast in Utah, to studying painting in Maryland, to teaching painting in Michigan. The last time his luscious large-scale works showed in the region they won a competition over at Target Gallery in Alexandria. This time he gets his own show. Sublime Rupture is showing at Target through early September. The collection features highly saturated canvases depicting happy people in chaotic situations. You can meet Duke and discuss his work at a reception Thursday evening.

(Aug. 7-26) Canada’s Best
If you’re in North Bethesda on Thursday evening and see close to 100 Canadian youth milling about, don’t be alarmed. They’re in town to capture your imagination with their charm and classical performance. The Great White North’s internationally acclaimed National Youth Orchestra takes on Dvorak, Shostakovich, and others at Strathmore. If history’s any indication, you’re sure to see some of these young ones rising to the stratosphere of classical music stardom before long.

Music: “Bach: Concerto In C For 3 Harpsichords” by Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra

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