Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Aug 2 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Aug 2

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Hugo Gellert's portrait of Amelia Earhart is part of One Life at the National Portrait Gallery.
National Portrait Gallery
Hugo Gellert's portrait of Amelia Earhart is part of One Life at the National Portrait Gallery.

(Aug. 2-May 27) Lady Lindy
You may have noticed a tribute to Amelia Earhart when you tried to Google something last week. The aviation pioneer disappeared 75 years ago last month. In recognition of her legacy, the National Portrait Gallery has corralled an exhibition of images, video footage, and audio snippets together. One Life: Amelia Earhart tells her story, focusing particular attention on her role in breaking barriers for women, through May of next year.

(Aug. 2-Sept. 2) It’s the little things
Syrian-born Kurdish artist Lukman Ahmad came to the United States as a refugee in 2010. Before that move, he spent much of his life wandering through the Middle East without much by way of national identity or borders. He explores his cultural heritage through colorful paintings of struggling and joyous Kurdish women in A Small Hope, showing at Foundry Gallery in Northwest Washington through early September. There’s an opening reception for the work tomorrow evening at 6.

Music: “Where Do We Go?” by Bill Frisell

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