WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, July 12

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This year's Capital Fringe Festival has everything reflections on religion, indie-rock ballet, and teenage girls turning into velociraptors.
MOVEius Dance
This year's Capital Fringe Festival has everything reflections on religion, indie-rock ballet, and teenage girls turning into velociraptors.

(July 12-29) Enough to make you Fringe
Washington’s annual Capital Fringe Festival kicks off today, so let’s run down a far-from-exhaustive list of possibilities for the next few weeks: An American-born Indian comedienne asks whether you can eat a Big Mac and still be a good Hindu in McGoddess; two teenagers turn into vicious pre-historic terrors in Gorgeous Raptors; and three women discover they share serious hair issues in The Hair Chronicles. Needless to say, the productions are staged at dozens of District venues and range from “targeting the tykes” to “find a sitter.”

(July 12-29) Over The Line!
You know you live in a theater town when there are two totally unrelated theater festivals opening on the same day. Over The Line Festival is the other one. It brings plays, dance, and music to the Round House Theatre in Silver Spring through July 29. Round House pledges more than ten companies will perform nearly 50 times in order to bring audiences something completely different every hour.

Music: “Bewilderbeast” by Badly Drawn Boy

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