WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, June 14

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Layla Mohammed portrays life in war-torn Iraq at the Davis Performing Arts Center this week.
Courtesy of Davis Performing Arts Center
Layla Mohammed portrays life in war-torn Iraq at the Davis Performing Arts Center this week.

(June 13-July 29) The battle that was

A group of friends fueled by anger, love, hope, and pride struggle to contain the mysteries ravaging New York City’s gay community in The Normal Heart. The unrelenting, mostly autobiographical Tony Award-winning play by author and activist Larry Kramer looks at sexual politics during the AIDS crisis at Arena Stage through late July.

(June 14, 16) 9 Parts of Desire

Georgetown University stages 9 Parts of Desire tonight and Saturday night at the Davis Performing Arts Center. The heartbreaking one-woman show delves into what it means to be a woman in war-torn Iraq with portraits of ordinary and extraordinary artists, Communists, doctors, wives, and lovers.

(June 14-Aug. 4) So teach us to number our days …

Alexandria’s Margaret Adams Parker presents woodcuts, etchings, and sculpture dealing with religious and social justice themes through early August at Crossroads Gallery in Falls Church. Parker hits on those big themes with subtle portraits of pregnant women, late-night commuters, and elderly couples. 

Music: "Places" by Shlohmo

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