WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, May 30

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Charlotte's Web is spinning away in Arlington.
Encore Stage & Studio
Charlotte's Web is spinning away in Arlington.

(May 30-June 16) The Illusion
Washington has plenty of theater to tie up your calendar for the next few weeks. Forum Theatre presents The Illusion through mid-June. Tony Kushner’s play finds an aging father turning to a sorcerer to help reach his long-lost son. Pops ends up in a maze of murder, conspiracy, romance, and intrigue at Silver Spring’s Round House Theatre.

(May 30) Suicide, Incorporated
If your sense of humor is decidedly dark, you may appreciate Suicide, Incorporated, opening at Northeast’s H Street Playhouse today. The acclaimed production explores what our lives are worth with a story about a business that helps its customers perfect their suicide notes.

(June 1-17) The Light Stuff
For some lighter fare, Encore Stage & Studio presents Charlotte’s Web in early June at the Thomas Jefferson Community Theatre in Arlington. And Flora the Red Menace puts a musical spin on the Great Depression, fashion, and organized labor through mid-June at 1st Stage in Tysons Corner.

Music: “My Home Is The Sea” by Matt Sweeny & Bonnie “Prince” Billy

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